The Inside Story from Italian Wine Merchants

Expert Picks: Pio Cesare and Bruno Giacosa

Posted on | April 26, 2016 | Written by Michael Adler | No Comments

Michael Adler 5.29.15Today I’ve chosen two killer Barolos from the outstanding 2004 vintage that were crafted by two of the region’s most historic and influential producers, Bruno Giacosa and Pio Cesare. 2004 is a perfect vintage to drink over the next decade or longer, depending on your individual preferences when it comes to enjoying mature wines. While family-owned-and-operated Pio Cesare has been making wines in Barolo for more than 100 years, the estate continues to innovate, constantly striving to improve quality in both the vineyard and in the cellar. If you’ve been in the IWM client family for long, then you probably don’t need me to tell you how special Bruno Giacosa’s wines are. Located in the town of Neive in the heart of the Langhe region, Giacosa consistently crafts some of the very finest wines to come out of both Barolo and Barbaresco, and after a decade of aging in the bottle, this ’04  will knock your socks off.

Pio Cesare 2004 Barolo $79.99

Surprisingly youthful in the glass, this 2004 Barolo from the historic Pio Cesare estate will benefit from an hour or two of decanting. Black and red fruits lead the charge, supported by notes of black tea, tar, crushed flower petals and spicy oak. This wine can easily age another 10 years if you’re so inclined, and if you have the patience. Pair it with braised lamb, a hearty risotto or a rare rib-eye steak.

Bruno Giacosa 2004 Barolo Croera di La Morra $225.00

In a stellar vintage like 2004, Giacosa’s wine have the potential to age for many decades, and this ‘04 Barolo Croera di La Morra is shaping up to be a wine for the ages. Even after ten years in bottle, this Barolo is still somewhat tight and massive, with intense, muscular tannins that will benefit from a long decant prior to pouring the wine. Bright red cherries and berries are joined by notes of olive tapenade, dried roses, cigar tobacco and minerals, and the finish lingers for what seems an eternity. As it is still relatively early in its development, I’d suggest holding this one for another 5-8 years if you have the patience.

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